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Traffic Calming

Larimer County's Traffic Calming Brochure


The following is a summary of the recommendations of the Neighborhood Traffic Safety Task Force accepted by the Board of County Commissioners. The Neighborhood Traffic Safety Task Force was created to help develop standards for implementing "traffic calming" measures in Larimer County.

Summary

  • The speed humps are intended for use in residential areas where speeds are 30 mph or less.
  • A clear majority (65 percent) of affected residents must agree with the proposal.
  • The speed humps must conform to the design guidelines of the Institute of Transportation Engineers, and the neighborhood will bear the cost of installing and maintaining the speed humps.

The speed humps will be at least 12 feet in length and 3 to 4 inches in height. They are intended to make drivers more aware of their speeds by imparting a rocking motion, but can still be comfortably crossed at speeds of 20 to 25 mph. Shorter, more abrupt speed bumps which require drivers to nearly stop before crossing would not be allowed under the proposed guidelines. In applications throughout the country speed humps have been effective in curbing speeding in residential neighborhoods. The cost of installing the proposed speed humps range from approximately $1500 to $3000 each. Neighborhoods with existing speed bumps are required to replace those bumps with the new standard after three years if the County receives complaints from existing residents.


Purpose:

  • People want to feel safe in their neighborhoods; they want to feel their streets are reasonably safe for all modes of transportion, including vehicles, walking, bicycling, horseback riding, etc.
  • People want to feel like they have some level of neighborhood control over their residential streets to achieve that feeling of safety.

Implementation issues addressed:

  • What kinds of streets will speed humps be permitted on?
    • Primary intent is for residential streets only
    • Could be situations where speed humps could be justified on minor collector streets in residential neighborhoods
    • Speed humps not permitted on streets with speed limits greater than 30mph

  • What level of consensus is required?
    • 65% of property owners in the "affected traffic area"

  • What constitutes an "affected traffic area?"
    • An affected traffic area shall consist of the owners of property that in any way abuts the street footage where speed humps are proposed. Additionally, the affected traffic area shall include the owners of any property where the only ingress or egress requires passage over the street footage where speed humps are proposed.
    • The following exceptions to the above shall apply in situations where all or part of the financial responsibility for the maintenance of the proposed street footage for speed humps rests with any organization or entity besides Larimer County (i.e. homeowner associations, special improvement districts, etc.):
      • To be included in the affected traffic area count, the property owner(s) MUST belong to the organization or entity (and be properly assessed for affected street maintenance) that has financial responsibility for maintaining the proposed street footage for speed humps, even if their geographic location would normally have included that property in the affected traffic area; and conversely;
      • Any property owner that does belong to the organization or entity (and is properly assessed for affected street maintenance) that has financial responsibility for maintaining the proposed street footage for speed humps shall by definition be included in the count for affected traffic area, even if their geographic location would normally have excluded that property from the affected traffic area.

  • What if an individual homeowner is in the affected traffic area and doesn't want a speed hump directly in front of their property?
    • A homeowner who does not wish a speed hump adjacent to their property may request that the proposed location be moved; this request would be accepted if the movement did not compromise the effectiveness of the hump in reducing speed--final decision in this case would rest with the County

  • What kind of humps or bumps would be allowed?
    • Require ITE-suggested "humps" (as used in city of Fort Collins) as opposed to "bumps"
    • ITE recommended humps span a 12' distance with a maximum vertical rise of between 3 and 4 inches, appropriately signed and painted

  • What about existing bumps that have been installed in various neighborhoods that don't meet this engineering standard?
    • Require all speed bumps on county dedicated roads meet ITE standard within 3 years from the implementation of these recommendations by the county
    • County would need to be prepared to pay for the removal of non-conforming bumps after 3 years in neighborhoods that are unwilling or unable to pay for upgrade or removal (complaint basis only)

  • How will speed humps be funded?
    • The responsibility for funding speed humps must lie with residents of the neighborhood that want them

  • What if a neighborhood decides they don't want speed humps anymore?
    • Removal process would essentially be the same as installation
      • Definition of affected traffic area is the same
      • 65% of property owners in affected traffic area must want removal
      • Funding of removal should come from neighborhood residents

Other physical traffic mitigation devices:

  • Barricades: Looked at closing through streets to discourage cut-through traffic
    • These may be considered in special circumstances but require evaluation of emergency services accessibility, connectitivity to adjacent parcels. Barricades require approval by the Board of County Commissioners.
    • Same criteria as speed humps apply (65% of affected traffic area, ITE engineering standards, self-funded, etc.)

  • Other devices (roundabouts, raised crosswalks, etc.)
    • Same criteria as speed humps apply (65% of affected traffic area, ITE engineering standards, self-funded, etc.) Probably not popular due to prohibitive cost

  • Stop signs:
    • Task force does not recommend the use of unwarranted stop signs as speed control devices

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